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Thursday, July 14, 2005

 

YES!!! WE REALLY MOVED!!

PLEASE GO TO http://PetLvr.com/blog/ - Our New Blog Site ... We are not posting here anymore. The feed below is showing the headines from entries in our "REAL" blog at the above address.

Our new RSS Syndication url .. http://feeds.feedburner.com/Petlvrcom-theBlog

We hope you drop by!







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Friday, July 08, 2005

 

WE HAVE MOVED!


PLEASE UPDATE YOUR BOOKMARKS ....


Our New Blog is Located on our own server now ...

PetLvr.com - [The NEW Blog] - http://www.PetLvr.com/blog/


Our New RSS/XML feed can be copied/pasted into your newsfeeder ...

OUR NEW FEED URL FOR PETLVR.COM - [THE BLOG] - http://feeds.feedburner.com/Petlvrcom-theBlog


PLEASE NOTE:
===========

All entries and comments found in this blogspot site has been imported into the new website, so there will be no reason to switch back and forth.

We thank-you for your co-operation and understanding and hope you enjoy our new site!

Take care.
HART
PetLvr.com

==================================
FROM: OUR NEW LOCATION - http://www.petlvr.com/blog/2005/07/we-have-moved-welcome-to-our-new-url/
=================================

Have Moved … WELCOME TO OUR NEW URL!
I hope we haven’t inconvenienced you in anyway.

I have converted our old http://PetLvr.blogspot.com to our new location here at http://www.PetLvr.com/blog. I hope you like the new look.

I actually didn’t want to move. But, I should have created this blog on our Domain PETLVR.COM right from the start. I have been experimenting over the last few weeks trying to get BLOGGER.COM to FTP publish the old template into our domain, but for the life of me .. I couldn’t figure this out and was kept on receiving errors.

So, I downloaded WORDPRESS which is this blog program, and I have made the switch effective today – Friday July 8, 2005.

I hope you bear with me while I am rechecking all of my links and URL’s that are part of this PetLvr.com website.

For now – those of you linking our RSS/XML Atom feeds .. here are the new links…

For Our Entries:
http://feeds.feedburner.com/Petlvrcom-theBlog

All entries up to Thursday July 7, 2005 have been imported successfully into this new Blog, including comments.

I hope you all bear with us … as for myself, I have not only created the extra work in switching everything but, I have to learn a whole new program as well. And, our great Contributors have to learn how to use this new program as well.

The good news is, though, that WORDPRESS is much more flexible in the archiving and sorting of information, and that our information is much easier to find under [THE CATEGORIES] heading on the right side of this page.

Oh well .. I am going to miss my Google ToolBar … sniffles

If you have any comments about this new blog site, feel free to add your comments or email me directly at hart@PetLvr.com.

Take care.
HART
PetLvr.com




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Wednesday, July 06, 2005

 

The Older Pet Health Status Evaluation


The Older Pet Health Status Evaluation at ThePetCenter.com


The Older Pet Health Status Evaluation

Parts wear out as we all get older Introduction: Preventive medicine, whether for yourself or your family pet, has been a long established method of improving health. Essentially, it means early detection of those factors that may progress to disease. In addition, preventative medicine loosely defined may cross over into the realm of restorative medicine... that is discovering a malady in its early stages and correcting the disease process before it becomes a serious health risk.

Older dogs and cats have special problems easily overlooked even by conscientious owners. Dental and oral problems, kidney and bladder infections, diabetes, tumors and nearly any disorder common in humans is a possibility in our pet companions.

Goal: The ultimate objective of the "Older Pet Health Evaluation" is to assist patients in achieving a longer, healthier life. At many animal hospitals the veterinarians have developed an Older Pet Health Evaluation protocol that provides a very careful physical exam coordinated with a comprehensive laboratory analysis. The goal of this analysis is threefold:
1. To define areas of potential health risk.
2. To detect and correct existing health problems.
3. To encourage the pet owners to continue with health enhancing procedures.

PROCEDURE

Admission: The pet is admitted to the hospital in the morning and the veterinarian who is in charge of the case takes a thorough history (called anamnesis) and pays close attention to any major health impacting events in the pet's life. Current activity levels, nutritional factors and medications being administered are some of the topics discussed with the pet's caretaker. Vaccination status and recent health factors are also assessed.

Physical Exam: The veterinarian performs a thorough physical exam in the presence of the pet's caretaker, encouraging the pet's caretaker to make any comments that may prompt the veterinarian's information gathering so that any subtle or forgotten aspects of the pet's body condition can be evaluated. The weight is recorded (and should be recorded every time the pet is brought to the hospital) and any deviations from normal are noted on the health chart.

Routine Lab Checks: Blood is drawn for a basic Chemistry Panel and a CBC (Complete Blood Count) and a urine sample is collected. Usually the owner can obtain the urine at home in a clean container before the appointment. Take a look at common laboratory tests that are included in a Chemistry Panel and an example of a real urinalysis below.

An enlarged heart is a common geriatric problem X-rays (Radiographs): If there is any indication of arthritis, abnormal aspects of the physical exam, or other suspicious elements in the history or physical exam, radiographs are taken to gather more data on the patient.

Evaluation: When all laboratory test results are available, x-ray films have been read and the data gathering process is complete, the veterinarian will make an evaluation. If there are any substantial deviations from normal for a pet of this age, the veterinarian may suggest further tests be done. For example, if the patient is evaluated as being healthy but the history indicates a lack of energy or enthusiasm and the physical exam displays an overweight pet with some deficiencies in the coat condition... the veterinarian may suspect Hypothyroidism. Further blood testing with emphasis on the thyroid function will be suggested. Another example would be the suggestion of bone marrow biopsy if there seems to be a significant lack of platelets and white blood cells, or the biopsy of a lymph node if far too many lymphocytes are noted on the CBC (Complete Blood Count).

Action: The veterinarian will discuss the results of the entire "Older Pet Health Evaluation" with the pet caretaker and suggest actions that should be taken. If a biopsy or further blood or urine tests are indicated, permission is obtained from the owner to proceed with additional tests and the next steps are taken. If the pet is healthy, another "Older Pet Health Evaluation" is scheduled for the following year and the owner is encouraged to contact the veterinarian if anything suspicious develops in the interim.

SUMMARY

WHAT!! This Scale has got to be wrong!! The pet is admitted to the animal hospital for a preliminary discussion between the veterinarian and owner and a thorough physical exam is performed. Special attention is paid to dental health, presence of arthritis, abnormal growths, cardiac and ocular function, prostate and colon abnormalities and more. It is important for the owner to be present for the physical exam because the owner can provide important suggestions and answer pertinent questions at this time. The exam and medical history discussion may take somewhere between ten and thirty minutes and covers such topics as previous medical problems, dietary considerations, individual habits of the pet and how the pet relates to its environment. The patient is kept in the hospital for part of the day during which time blood and urine samples are procured for analysis.

Some of the laboratory work is done "in house" at the animal hospital and some analyses are performed by local specialized medical labs that pick up specimens on a daily routine basis. The blood analysis includes what is commonly called a CBC and a CHEMISTRY PANEL. This is a very comprehensive hematological exam. The urine analysis checks for the presence of blood or bacteria in the urine and cultures can be done to grow any bacteria in order to determine the best antibiotic to use in therapy. Additionally, the urine density, protein level, acidity and other very important aspects of urinary tract health are evaluated.

Older pets need much more attention in their later years When the pet is discharged later in the day, the veterinarian will discuss the findings with the owner. The pet may need dental care, or have a growth removed before it gets unmanageable, or have an x-ray taken to evaluate a painful joint. At discharge from the hospital, the pet is scheduled for any follow-up work that the thorough physical exam revealed is needed. In addition, the owner receives a copy of the physical exam report and a copy of the laboratory analysis. Especially in the older dog or cat, periodic, thorough health evaluation is very important in maintaining an optimum "quality of life".

*****************************************

The Urinalysis: The following tests are generally performed on a urine sample, and the urine from an interesting case is documented that display some abnormal results...

Specific Gravity... 1.005 This measures how concentrated or dilute the urine is so this is very dilute!
Protein... +1 (This is not very significant. +3 or +4 would be remarkable.)
Blood... Trace This is noteworthy but not alarming.
pH 5... This means that the urine is very acid. Urine almost never is this acid normally!
Bilirubin...None (This means the liver's internal bile channels are not obstructed.)
Ketones... None (This would be positive in diabetics and starving animals.)
Sediment (This displays any solids that are a part of the urine sample. The solids settle to the bottom of a test tube that is spun in a centrifuge. The fluid portion is poured off leaving the solids for microscopic exam.)
White Blood Cells: 50+ per HPF This means High Power Field: The microscope is getting a really close look! Fifty white blood cells per HPF is significant and indicates inflammation or infection and possibly leukemia.
RBCs: 5 per HPF This refers to Red Blood Cells and there should be none seen in a normal urine sample.
Bacteria: 2+ (0 to 4+ scale) Rods Rods are a type of bacteria and a normal urine sample should have no bacteria present.
Epi cells: 2+ (0 to 4+ scale) Epi (epithelial) cells are cells that line the inside of the urinary tract. 2+ epi cells may or may not be significant.

*****************************************

The Chemistry Panel: Some typical tests routinely included in a Chemistry Panel are displayed below. Each laboratory will provide the veterinarian a range of values that represent likely normal parameters. These "normal values" often will vary from lab to lab; there are good reasons to pick a reliable, professional laboratory that has a database of animal values against which abnormal values can be contrasted. Most veterinarians will suggest repeating a test if any values fall just out of the normal range because there may be transient abnormal values in a healthy pet, so if a value falls out of the "normal" range repeating the test in a few days will indicate if the suspect value truly is abnormal or if it has presently fallen back into the "normal" range.

Sodium
Glucose
Total Protein
Alkaline Phosphatase
Amylase
Potassium
BUN (Blood Urea Nitrogen)
Albumin
Alanine Amino- transferase (ALT)
Total Bilirubin
Calcium
Creatinine
Albumin/Globulin Ratio
Amylase
Total Cholesterol

*****************************************

The CBC: The Complete Blood Count is a highly important aspect of a complete "Older Pet Health Evaluation" because of the insight it provides into the invisible world of the individual's cellular environment. Even small deviations from normal should be followed by repeat tests to see if a pattern of higher or lower values are occurring. The usual parameters that are included in a CBC are the following:

White Blood Cell Count (WBC)
Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV)
Red Blood Cell Count (RBC)
Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin (MCH)
Packed Cell Volume (PCV or Hematocrit)
Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration (MCHC)
Hemoglobin
Platelets
Segmented Neutrophils
Lymphocytes
Immature Neutrophils (Band cells)
Monocytes
Basophils
Myelocytes
Reticulocytes
Eosinophils

*****************************************

Most animal hospitals will suggest a Geriatric Workup for older pets as an important aspect of preventative veterinary medicine... "It is better to prevent disease than to have to cure it". The age at which a pet could be classified as a "Older Pet" is quite subjective. For example a Bull Mastiff may be considered geriatric at age 7 and at the same age a miniature poodle is just getting warmed up! Some cats live into their twenties and might be considered an "older pet beginning around twelve years of age. The effects of age on any individual are determined by a number of factors including environmental impacts, diet, activity levels, weight control and especially genetic predispositions. You, your pet and your veterinarian form a unit which, if all parts are in close integration with one another, can promote a lasting and rewarding "full life" experience for each individual. Consider asking your veterinarian about an "Older Pet Health Evaluation".

~~~~~~~~~~

Click on the link at the beginning of this article...

ThePetCenter.com
"The Internet Animal Hospital"

Comments:
Unfortunately my doggies eyes look the same as this dog, but mine became blind because of retinal disease. Nothing could be done. He doesnt know he is blind though, he gets around great!
 
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From MyDoghouse, My New Ebook Guide to Pets



The
E Book Index Guide to Pets.
: Learn and Study all about your Pet. Be an informed Pet Owner. For the Love of YOUR Pets

Posted By Ruth
http://www.happypetstop.com



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Tuesday, July 05, 2005

 

Rabbit As Pet


Rabbit As Pet


Rabbit As Pet
By Amanda Gates

Rabbits are one of the most popular pets, apart from dogs and cats. They look attractive, lovely, gentle, friendly and cute. They are easy to take care and undemanding in terms of care and housing. They will settle well either indoor or outdoor, at home.

There are 40 species of rabbits and hares worldwide. All domesticated rabbits are originated from European rabbits. The scientific name for domestic rabbit is Oryctolagus cuniculus.

Typically, domesticated rabbits weigh between 2.2-221lb (1-10kg). The domesticated rabbits can be fed on commercially produced rabbit food, pellets, hay, green food, root vegetables, tree bark, herbs and apple.

The gestation period of a rabbit is 31 days and the typical litter size ranges from 6-8 young. The lifespan varies with breed.

Keeping a rabbit as pet requires a good training system to prevent unnecessary destructions or hassle. For example, furniture and carpet chewing problems, pseudo pregnancy symptoms, litter problems, fights, behavioral problems, rabbit-house worries, sickness, fleas, predators and etc. Nevertheless, these challenges can be overcome when the owners have the knowledge and experience to deal with them. Thus, one of the recommended ways to acquire the important knowledge is to read widely and exchange practical information with experienced rabbit owners.

It is important to watch out for any abnormalities in your rabbits as rabbits are susceptible to various digestive ailments and other life-threatening diseases. For example, rabbits are vulnerable to myxomatosis and VHD viruses. These are the killer viruses!

There is no universal system of classification for rabbit breeds. Some popular breeds of rabbits include:

· Alaska
· American Fuzzy Lop
· American Sable
· Angora
· Belgian Hare
· Beveren
· Californian
· Champagne D’Argent
· Checkered Giant
· Chinchilla
· Dutch
· Dwarf Hotot
· English Lop
· Flemish Giant
· Florida White
· Harlequin
· Havana
· Himalayan
· Hotot
· Jersey Wooly
· Lilac
· Holland Lop
· Mini Lop
· Mini Rex
· Netherland Dwarf
· New Zealand
· Palomino
· Polish
· Rex
· Rhinelander
· Satin
· Silver
· Silver Fox
· Silver Marten
· Tan

Yours Sincerely,
Amanda Gates,
http://www.rabbitinfo.careforpet-rabbit.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/




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Lion cubs make appearance at city zoo


CBC Manitoba - Lion cubs make appearance at city zoo


Lion cubs make appearance at city zoo
Last Updated Jul 4 2005 01:54 PM CDT
CBC News

For the first time in 25 years, visitors to Winnipeg's Assiniboine Park Zoo can see lion cubs.

The cubs were born at the end of April to a pair of lions on loan to the zoo. In fact, the zoo did not confirm the female, Savannah, was pregnant until the two male cubs were born.

The cubs were kept in seclusion until they were old enough to be vaccinated. They and their mother have just begun venturing into their outer enclosure, next to the enclosure for their father, Vince.

Zoo officials say the two cubs have "big feet and charming faces."

The zoo is launching a "name the lion cubs" contest. Entries must be made by visiting the zoo before closing on Aug. 2. The winner, who will receive a lion-themed gift basket, will be chosen by a team of zoo staff and children who attend the zoo's camp.

The Assiniboine Park Zoo hasn't had lions since 1982. The lion family is on loan for the summer through the zoo's Animal Encounters program.

The zoo plans to give up the animals when cold weather returns this fall, since it doesn't have the facilities to keep them year-round.

Links related to this story:

ASSINIBOINE ZOO: More on the zoo

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"Name the two male lion cubs" contest? I would name them .. ZEUSSIE and MAXXIE .. of course! I plan to visit the zoo before the August 2, 2005 deadline.

HART
PetLvr.com



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Sunday, July 03, 2005

 

On The Road With Your Cat


TRAVELING WITH YOUR PET: On The Road With Your Cat to ThePetCenter.com


On The Road With Your Cat!

Maybe you’ll be lucky and your kitty will be a “Napper”. On the other hand your feline car companion could be the embodiment of Feline Road Rage. You won’t know until you try.



Cats!! These little creatures always seem to be a challenge when it comes to transporting them from one place to another. If you have never listened to the forlorn yodeling of a terrified cat on its way to the veterinarian you have missed a true spectacle of nature. And if you have heard these shrieks and cries from a panicked cat you’d be very thankful you did not experience it while out camping some dark night.

Only one cat in a hundred will curl up contentedly on the car seat next to you while on a trip. Nobody knows for sure why the other ninety-nine totally loose it and think they’re falling into outer space. Accept the fact that traveling with a cat may require a few preliminary preparations in order to make the experience at least tolerable for you and your little feline friend.

First… invest in some sort of crate or fabric containment. If you can get your cat into one of these portable products (that could be the subject of an entire article all by itself!) the cat will be much more secure physically and psychologically. Cats go into a sort of “I’m safe in here” mode when they find themselves enclosed within a crate. They still may yowl and cry but if that does occur, at least they won’t be able to use your forehead as a springboard to the ceiling of the car!

Once you have a travel crate, place it in the house with the door open, put a little treat and a small litter box in it, and then ignore it. Do not put the cat into it because the kitty will immediately understand what you are up to and won’t go near it again. They’re not dumb! Here’s what the cat would say to itself… “Hmmm, might have to urinate on that thing just to show it who’s boss around here”.

NOTE: Many veterinarians and pet owners believe strongly in buckling up pets in a car just as you would a child. There are many types of restraining devices for dogs BUT FEW FOR CATS. You might consider using a padded fabric type of crate for your cat instead of the plastic or wire crates in order to keep your cat in place during a trip and to ensure additional safety in case of an accident. Collars, harnesses and leashes are a must for any travelin' cat. The bottom line? Be prepared.

On the other hand if you allow the cat to discover this neat little den/crate right in its own house, you may find the kitty hangin’ out in it. Then someday when you need to capture the feline trickster to transport it to the veterinary hospital all you’ll have to do is keep an eye out for when the kitty is inside the crate and slam the door on your way by. Now a trip in the car will be safe for you and the cat. Don’t worry about putting food and water in the crate; healthy cats can go without food and water for many hours.

Do some occasional trial runs prior to any long trip you need to take so that you know what to expect when you have to be your cat’s driver on a cross-country escapade. If your cat really seems uncomfortable and cries like a banshee for any longer than twenty minutes, you may need to contact your veterinarian about using a tranquilizer prior to a long trip. It can be difficult to discern whether your cat is displaying Hyperactivity or is in the throws of Motion sickness. Describe what your cat is doing in the crate (quiet and drooling or going bonkers and screaming) and your veterinarian will be able to prescribe appropriate medication to allow the kitty to be comfortable.

For you folks who are really opposed to medicating your pet, be assured that the medications are very helpful in providing the least amount of stress on your cat while it is going through an experience it finds horrific and unexplainable. A terrified cat is probably thinking along these lines…“Thunder!!” when the engine turns on. “Earthquake!!” when the car starts to move or bounces over bumps. “Hydrocarbon fumes!!” when it smells auto, bus and truck exhaust. “I’m falling sideways!!” when it glances out the window and those trees are whizzing by. Can you blame the cat for feeling disoriented? Medication may be a very humane choice for your kitty.

Never open a crate with a cat inside unless you are prepared for the cat to spring out of the crate and make a dash for freedom! One of the most dangerous and embarrassing events you will encounter with your cat is trying to retrieve it from the rafters of the building you are in. And the odds are overwhelming stacked in favor of someone innocently opening the front door of the animal hospital just at the moment your kitty spies the tallest pine tree across the parking lot of the animal hospital. “What was that!” the innocent door opener says as you and half the animal hospital staff file out the door in hot pursuit of the escapee.

It can be dangerous, too, in the enclosed exam room when the veterinarian opens the crate or travel container. Some cats are wound as tight as a miser just waiting for their chance to escape. The natural tendency is to climb to safety… and injury will result if the kitty uses a person for a tree. You need to go slowly when removing the cat from the container; let the cat orient a bit before trying to get your hands on the kitty. It may be best to open the crate or container and allow the cat to amble out on its own. Be careful.

A healthy cat may not move an inch for six to eight hours at a time. Allow a little food and water but don’t expect the cat to even glance at the feast you’ve provided. At your motel sometime during the night, when everyone is sound asleep, the kitty will use the litter box and have a private banquet on its own terms. Your cat may use the litter box once, eat oncee and drink once every twenty-four hours when on a long trip. The odds are you will be worrying more about these behaviors than the cat.

Never, ever, let your cat loose when on a trip. It makes no difference how “good” your cat is at walking with you at home. On a trip you and your cat are in a different world and if your cat, for any number of reasons, “takes off” you may never see it again. Some sort of an ID tag is always a good idea. If your cat simply will not wear a collar, here’s an idea: Have a groomer or your veterinarian shave some fur from the cat’s belly. Using a Magic Marker write your name and phone number on the kitty. Eventually the fur will grow back and the marking will fade but this little trick may just save your lost cat’s life.

If you are like most cat owners, you will not look forward to traveling in the car with your little pal. Nevertheless, if done often enough, maybe you will be one of those lucky 1% whose cat thinks a ride in the car is a human invention designed specifically for cats to see the world much more efficiently.

ON THE ROAD
The very first rule of traveling with your cat is to have an ID tag or other means of identification securely affixed to the kitty. Thousands of dogs and cats end up in shelters simply because the owners never dreamed the pet would get loose or become lost while on a trip. There are few disasters in a person’s life that are worse than having to drive off without a pet because all means of locating and recovery have failed. This kind of tragedy will haunt you for the rest of your life; don’t let it happen. Get an ID tag!

Before you leave make sure you consider the option of leaving your cat in a hometown boarding facility Many are just for cats and do not board dogs. Others have the cats well away from any sight, sound or smell of a canine. Visit the local boarding facility and see what goes on. Also there may be a Pet Sitter in your area who would tend your pets in your own home. With a Pet Sitter you can even call home and tell your cat how much fun you’re having… Oh, and also how much you miss the rascal. In this section we’ll sample a few ideas that will help to facilitate a safe and enjoyable road trip. Make sure you know how your cat reacts to trips by taking a number of local short trips, then if you need to take an “all-dayer” you’ll have a good idea of what to expect. Any “all-dayer” is just a bunch of short trips anyway. So, before you set off on that cross country trip be sure that you are confident that you can predict how your pet will behave.

MOTION SICKNESS
Vomit happens. Sometimes even humans get carsick. Most cats can overcome motion sickness through desensitizing them by repeat short, uneventful trips. Gradually accustom the cat to spending time in the car with the engine off, then with the engine on, then short trips, then the cross-country adventure. Prior to a trip be sure the cat has had food and water available, then remove food and water at least three hours before you set off. You can also use anti-motion sickness medications to help settle the stomach and prevent the sometimes prolific drooling that occurs in a nauseous cat. Most medications used to prevent motion sickness are very safe antihistamines and many cats eventually will travel without the aid of medical assistance. Just in case, bring a roll of paper towels.

Note: Motion sickness or hyperactivity? Here’s the difference… cats with motion sickness are generally quiet and even a little depressed because they feel awful. They will drool all over the place, maybe even pass stool, and eventually start vomiting. The forlorn howling you might hear reminds one of a dark, creepy Halloween night! Even with an empty stomach the vomiting reflex can be very strong. These cats will greatly benefit from anti-motion sickness medication if it is given long enough in advance of the trip to be working by the time you start the journey.

The cat that goes bonkers when in a vehicle demonstrates hyperactivity. These cats aren’t sick, they’re possessed! Salivating, panting, whining, jumping from front seat to back, swatting at non existent butterflies and trying to cling upside down to the roof of the car are common characteristics of the hyperactive feline traveler. If you must bring the hyperactive cat with you, medication to sedate the kitty will surely make the trip safer, easier and less stressful for both you and the cat.

THIS CAT’S HYPER!
The key to successful use of pretrip medication is to administer it well before the trip starts. Some cats start their Tae Bo routine as soon as they HEAR the word car! Be nonchalant, sneak a little medication in a treat, and don’t mention the c a r anywhere near the cat prior to your trip. If you believe your cat may be a candidate for medication, be sure to do a leisurely pretrip trial well ahead of the time you REALLY need it. About one cat out of ten will not respond in the common way to a particular medication or a particular dose. You do not want to find this out the morning of an eight-hour, midwinter trip through the Rockies to accept that national writing award you won for the article on "Logical Steps To Effective Planning".

ATTENTION!
Yours should always be on the traffic, not on the cat!. If your traveling pal is a good traveler, it might curl up next to you on the seat and, ah... well, take a cat nap. (Sorry, had to say it.) Do not ever allow a pet to go near the driver side floor where the brake and gas pedals are located. And the dashboard must be out of bounds for safety sake.

TRAVEL CRATES
These inventions are very handy. Your cat, if happy and comfortable in a crate, will be safer and you will have the peace of mind knowing it is secure when you must leave your friend alone for short periods. If you do use a crate, be certain that the cat is totally accustomed to it well prior to the trip. PetFoodDirect.com has an assortment of crates, leashes and other restraining devices that will add to the safety and enjoyment of traveling with your pet.

PLAN AHEAD
Plan ahead… well ahead. If you know you will be staying overnight somewhere, be sure to have reservations at an establishment that welcomes pets. A handy list of “Pet Friendly” motels/hotels can be found if you do a little searching. Don’t even think about it if you hope to hide your cat in your room or think you will launch a successful appeal to the motel owner’s sense of sympathy if you show up with an 25 pound Maine Coon! And don't forget to bring along some disposable "Scoop n Toss Bags"; you must be socially conscious about where your kitty chooses to relieve itself. Your portable litter box may not be the cat's first choice. Be prepared!

FOOD AND WATER
It wouldn’t hurt to pamper your pal… bring along your cat’s own food and drinking water from home and you will be better off. Not that you’re fussy, right? And a few old towels or rags will make good cleanup devices if the cat happens to discover a mud puddle or contacts something nasty like spilled ice cream sundaes! Emergency first aid kits are very handy for you and the cat if a sudden cut, sliver or rash intrudes upon your day. Anti-itch medication, bandages, and antibiotic ointments may save the day when you least expect something will go wrong. It is a good idea to have your veterinarian give you a copy of the cat’s medical history to take with you just in case a visit to a veterinarian along the way becomes necessary.

LEASHES
Here’s a safety tip… Bring two leashes. That way you’ll have a spare when you misplace one. Cats are notorious for doing Houdini-like escapes from their collars. A harness is much more secure, especially the ones that will adjust according to the amount of tension placed against it. The harder a cat pulls the tighter and more secure the slip harness becomes. Travel crates human versions of dens, make great containment devices and many cats enjoy hiding out in them while traveling.

HEAT STROKE!
Leaving a pet alone in a car has a number of potential risks. Always be conscious of the effects of heat buildup in a parked car. It only takes a few minutes for the internal heat to build up forty degrees above the outside air temperature especially if direct sunlight bakes the car. Even the cat’s body heat (expired air in the cat’s breath is 102 degrees!) will act like a heater inside the car. Leaving windows open slightly at the top surely helps IF there is a breeze. Be very cautious about leaving pets unattended in parked cars. Heat stroke is a dire emergency and one from which many pets do not recover. And you'd be shocked to find out just how fast it can happen.

HAVE FUN!
Don’t forget to bring along some fun toys and tasty treats... just so the kitty knows that this traveling stuff is really fun! Don’t forget the camera! Visit PetFoodDirect.com for lots of treats and toys to entertain your cat while on the go!


~~~~~~~~~~

Click on the link at the beginning of this article...

ThePetCenter.com
"The Internet Animal Hospital"

Comments:
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After this post I'm adding a link to your blog from my blogroll on my blog!

I hope you have a great day!
 
Hey, I just found your blog, and I read... and read... and read... and finally, decided that you and your other readers might want to check out my Cat Furniture site.
 
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On The Road With Your Dog


TRAVELING WITH YOUR PET: On The Road With Your Dog To ThePetCenter.com


On The Road With Your Dog

Maybe you’ll be lucky and your dog will be a “Napper”. On the other hand your canine car companion could be the embodiment of Rover Road Rage. You won’t know until you try.



TRAINING THE NEW PUP
Let’s start out on our own literary journey down this freeway of discovery and try to understand the many facets of successful traveling with a dog. And the best place for us to start is with a puppy. If you have an adult dog that has not traveled before, skip this puppy class and proceed to ON THE ROAD.

Puppies are smart. They just don’t know it yet. So you’ve got to show them how smart they are by putting them through a few little practice sessions prior to show time. Soon after you have that new pup home, spend some time in the car with it while the engine is off and the car is parked. Tiny tidbits of treats will assure the little rascal that cars are a neat place for snacking. After a few practice sessions, do the same routine with the engine running in a well-ventilated area (NOT in the garage!) Do not get all excited about how great the puppy is doing and be overly praising, if you do, your smart little pup will think this car stuff is a big deal and we don’t want that. To a dog, cars are just another area for snoozing or introspective world watching. If you are quiet and passive the pup will take your lead and learn to relaxed.

Gently speak to the pup. Sit quietly and try to show the pup that being in the car is normal and not a place for rope tugging, barking or games of “betcha-can’t-catch-me”. You set the tone. If you have to assert yourself, do so. Command the pup to sit and stay… then offering tiny rewards for being good will reinforce the self-control. That smart little pup will begin to understand what YOU want and expect. Remember that what you do now will set the stage for years of happy traveling together.

NOTE: Many veterinarians and pet owners believe strongly in buckling up pets in a car just as you would a child. There are many types of restraining devices for dogs that could significantly add to the safety of travel and you should seriously consider using such a device to keep your dog in place during a trip and to ensure additional safety in case of an accident.

Ok… so now after a few days of sitting in the parked car with the engine running, it’s time to strike out on that long ribbon of highway that leads right around the block and back into the driveway. The same rules apply: Calmness and control shall prevail. This is a good time to get the pup used to a restraining device that will secure the pup comfortably in the seat and yet will allow adequate mobility. Any signs that the pup wants to bark or climb through the window (they are closed, right?) to greet those moving trees, busses and other living creatures should be met with a firm command to "sit" and "stay". Reward with a tiny treat. In the beginning keep the trips short and be firm with your control of the situation. (Did I mention that this takes two people? It’s preferable to have a licensed driver at the wheel while you conduct riding etiquette school.) If you have more than one puppy, do not try to teach them both at the same time. Their attention will be directed toward each other and not on you.

As the schooling progresses the pup will get the idea that trips in the car are normal occurrences and are not constructed for the pup’s amusement. You will find your puppy pal will be a pleasure to have in the car with you and that it won’t tell anyone about your off key sing-alongs to the “Oldies”.

ON THE ROAD

The very first rule of traveling with your pet is to have an ID tag or other means of identification securely affixed to the dog. Thousands of dogs end up in shelters simply because the owners never dreamed the dog would get loose or become lost while on a trip. There are few disasters in a person’s life that are worse than having to drive off without a pet because every means of locating and recovery have failed. This kind of tragedy will haunt you for the rest of your life; don’t let it happen. Get an ID tag!

Before you leave make sure you consider the option of leaving your dog in a hometown kennel. Most dogs love being in a kennel; there’s lots of activity, they get special attention and in most cases consider a stay in the kennel like we would a stay at the beach. Visit the local kennel and see what goes on. Also there may be a Pet Sitter in your area who would tend your pets in your own home. With a Pet Sitter you can even call home and tell your dog how much fun you’re having... oh, yes, and also how much you miss the rascal.

In the following section we’ll sample a few ideas that will help facilitate a safe and enjoyable road trip. Make sure you know how your dog reacts to trips by taking a number of local short trips, then if you need to take an “all-dayer” you’ll have a good idea of what to expect. Any “all-dayer” is just a bunch of short trips anyway. So, before you set off on that cross country trip be sure that you are confident that you can predict how your dog will behave.

MOTION SICKNESS
Vomit happens. Sometimes even humans get carsick. Most dogs can overcome motion sickness through desensitizing them by using the same training sequences of steps as described above in the puppy training. Gradually accustom the dog to spending time in the car with the engine off, then with the engine on, then short trips, then the cross-country adventure. Prior to a trip be sure the dog has been fed at least three hours before you set off. You can also use anti-motion sickness medications to help settle the stomach and prevent the sometimes prolific drooling that occurs in a nauseous dog. Most medications are very safe antihistamines and many dogs eventually can travel without the aid of medical assistance. Just in case, bring a roll of paper towels.

Note: Motion sickness or hyperactivity? Here’s the difference… dogs with motion sickness are generally quiet and even a little depressed because they feel awful. They will drool all over the place, maybe even pass stool, and eventually start vomiting. Even with an empty stomach the vomiting reflex can be very strong. These dogs will greatly benefit from anti-motion sickness medication if it is given long enough in advance of the trip to be working before the dog even suspects that a ride in the car is imminent.

The dog that goes bonkers when in a vehicle demonstrates hyperactivity. These dogs aren’t sick, they’re possessed! Salivating, panting, whining, jumping from front seat to back, barking at butterflies and trying to sit on the steering wheel are common characteristics of the hyperactive canine traveler. If you must bring the hyperactive dog with you, medication to sedate the dog will surely make the trip safer, easier and less stressful for both the dog and the human.

THIS DOG’S HYPER!
What do you do with the dog that simply cannot control itself once that engine starts and the wheels begin to roll? If you have really tried to train the dog to do as it is told but the motion and noise of traveling are simply overpowering and turn your dog into a slathering, panting, barking demonstration of a Tae Bo exercise, there’s hope! Call your veterinarian and describe the demonstration. Then request medication that will “take the Tae out of the Bo”. There are a number of safe medications that will allow your dog to travel without all that stress, noise and confusion. It will be a safer trip for both of you, not to mention less stressful.

The key to successful use of pretrip medication is to administer it well before the trip starts. Some dogs start their Tae Bo routine as soon as they HEAR the word car! Be nonchalant, sneak a little medication in a treat, and don’t mention the c a r anywhere near the dog prior to your trip. If you believe your dog may be a candidate for medication, be sure to do a leisurely pretrip trial well ahead of the time you REALLY need it. About one dog out of ten will not respond well to a particular medication or a particular dose. You do not want to find this out the morning of an eight-hour, midwinter trip through the Rockies to accept that national writing award you won for the article on "Logical Steps To Effective Planning".

ATTENTION!
Yours should always be on the traffic, not on the dog. If your traveling pal is a little dog, they usually will curl up next to you on the seat and catch up on some sleep. Do not ever allow them to go near the driver side floor where the brake and gas pedals are located. Big dogs may be best situated in the back seat and then you can legally refer to the dog as your navigator. If you choose not to use a seat restraint a gate type barrier between the front and the back seats is a good idea to prevent an unexpected visit from your traveling companion.

TRAVEL CRATES
These inventions are very handy. Your dog, if happy and comfortable in a crate, will be safer and you will have the peace of mind knowing it is secure when you must leave your dog alone for short periods. If you do use a crate, be certain that the dog is totally accustomed to it well prior to the trip. PetFoodDirect.com has an assortment of crates, leashes and other restraining devices that will add to the safety and enjoyment of traveling with your pet.

PLAN AHEAD
Plan ahead… well ahead. If you know you will be staying overnight somewhere, be sure to have reservations at an establishment that welcomes pets. A handy list of “Pet Friendly” motels/hotels can be found if you do a little searching.. Don’t even think about it if you hope to hide your dog in your room or think you will launch a successful appeal to the motel owner’s sense of sympathy if you show up with an unannounced Great Pyrenees. And don't forget to bring along some disposable "Scoop n Toss Bags"; you must be socially conscious about where your dog chooses to relieve itself. Be prepared!

REST AREAS
Make your timetable consistent with occasional stops along a side road where your leashed dog can find relief. Many veterinarians do not think the Rest Stations along the Interstates are a particularly sanitary area for your dog. Not that you have to be fussy but why not select an area that avoids conditions where dozens of dogs have already baptized the environment? And be sure to have some “Pooper Pick-Ups” with you so that in the event of an unexpected deposit in a public area, you can perform the courteous cleanup immediately.

FOOD AND WATER
It wouldn’t hurt to pamper your pal… bring along your dog’s own food and water from home and you will be better off. Not that you’re fussy, right? And a few old towels or rags will make good cleanup devices if the dog happens to discover a mud puddle or contacts something nasty like spilled ice cream sundaes! Emergency first aid kits are very handy for you and the dog if a sudden cut, sliver or rash intrudes upon your day. Anti-itch medication, bandages, and antibiotic ointments may save the day when you least expect something will go wrong. It is a good idea to have your veterinarian give you a copy of the dog’s medical history to take with you just in case a visit to a veterinarian along the way becomes necessary.

LEASHES
Here’s a safety tip… Bring two leashes. That way you’ll have a spare when you misplace one. Your dog MUST be on a leash whenever you are in unfamiliar surroundings. All it takes is a split second for a disaster to start its fateful chain of events. There are hundreds of reasons why your dog has to be on a leash whenever you are not in your own back yard. Travel crates, human versions of dens, make great containment devices and many dogs enjoy hiding out in them while traveling; bring one if your dog likes the security of a crate.

HEAT STROKE!
Leaving a dog alone in a car has a number of potential risks. Always be conscious of the effects of heat buildup in a parked car. It only takes a few minutes for the internal heat to build up forty degrees above the outside air temperature especially if direct sunlight bakes the car. Even the dog’s body heat (expired air in the dog’s breath is 102 degrees!) will act like a heater inside the car. Leaving windows open slightly at the top surely helps IF there is a breeze. However, that opening also invites children to poke their fingers in or unkind folks to tease the dog with sticks. Be very cautious about leaving dogs unattended in parked cars. Heat stroke is a dire emergency and one from which many pets do not recover. And you'd be shocked to find out just how fast it can occur. If you ever find your pet distressed from overheating in a vehicle, get to the nearest animal hospital immediately... don't even call first; just GO! For minor mishaps, having a First Aid Kit on hand for your journey may be your wisest investment. And keep the phone number of your veterinarian accessible just in case you need to refill a lost prescription or need quick advice. Sadly, many pets are harmed every summer by inattention to the very real dangers of heat stroke. Look at more info on heatstroke in pets.

HAVE FUN!
Don’t forget to bring along some fun toys and tasty treats. These will keep the dog contented for hours while you enjoy your trip. And bring the camera! Visit PetFoodDirect.com for lots of treats and toys to entertain your dog while on the go!


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Click on the link at the beginning of this article...

ThePetCenter.com
"The Internet Animal Hospital"



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Saturday, July 02, 2005

 

Welcome to PetLvr.com - [The Blog] - Introduction



Welcome to PetLvr.com - [The Blog]. For those new to the blogging world, this will be your "BLOGGING-101" course and an introduction to our website. I plan to repost this entry at the beginning of every new month.

Blog Entries

This is a blog entry. While it looks like a normal website, really it is a series of website pages pulled together in one website. If you are familiar with our Tag-Board and other real-time chat programs like Tag-Board, the latest post is always on top. This is different from the Forums, where new posts are usually added to the bottom of the topic. You should be able to see the date of each blog entry at the beginning of each entry. At the end of each blog entry, you will see the link "Comments" just to the left of a caricature of my two Papillon Dogs. If you click this, you will expand the blog entry. While only myself, and the other contributors are allowed to post Blog Entries ... everyone is allowed to post a comment to our blog entry. So, if you feel like responding to what was published, feel free to do so.

Linking Inside this Blog Website

At the beginning of each entry, you will see a group of links that may or may not change in the future. It looks like this:

| Home | Top | About | Authors | Archives | Affiliates | Newsletter | Links |
Tag-Board | Site Feed | Utilities | News Feeds | The Cutest Pet! | Daily Cartoon | PetLvr Polls |

These are "Hot Links" to sections within this blog site. "TOP" will always get you to the top of the current page, and if you are on a sub-page, "HOME" will return you to the main start page. Feel free to experiment by clicking on each link to find out where you are transported to.

Archive Blog Entries

I have set this blog to display only the blog entries from the last 14 days. So, you may scroll down the page to view these entries. If you click on the hot link "Archives", you may click on any of the displayed months and this will display 100% of the blog entries created in that month, along with its comments.

Linking Outside this Blog Website

All links within blogs to either the source reference article or to other websites, will open up in a new window. There are "professional" blogger-geeks out there who think that this is a terrible crime to do this, because I must assume that the reader has no intelligence to Right-Click and select Open in New Window if they wanted to, or hit their Back button to return to their original position in our blog website.

And to the professional bloggers out there - :Ptftftffftt . Not because you think you can dictate to me how to design my website, that because of this one issue you would boycott my website altogether because of design, without consideration of the content. Shame on you.

PetLvr Community Corner ...

I have added this script to be used by all PetLvrs out there as you seem desire. You can have a Lost and Found ... add jokes, poems, and stories ... you can publicize current events that might be happening in your area or with your organization .. you can promote your pet-related website ... I don't care. All I ask is that you realize this is a general rated website and kids can be watching. At the current time, you will be required to create a Login Id and password to post contributions.

PetLvr Greeting E-Cards...

I have added this script to allow you to send anyone a picture from our PetLvr Picture Gallery ... to anyone or a series of people. There is no registration required. I will be periodically adding new pictures to the website. I might be adding new background music as well. Currently, I have included a bunch of TV Theme songs.

PetLvr Blog Pictures...

I have added this script to allow you to permanently upload your pet picture to our website and other PetLvr's may come and rate the picture. You will be required to create a Login ID to add your pet picture. If you just want to add your pet picture to our Gallery, without creating a Login Id, so you can send out Greeting E-Cards with your favorite pet picture .. use this "Cutest PetLvr Wars" instead.

Contributors Wanted

PetLvr.com is looking for contributors of content to this blog. All that is required is that the topic be "Pet Related". Do you have any expertise? Do you have any tips? Do you have cute pet stories? Do you have news of upcoming events? If you wish to become a CONTRIBUTOR to this blog, please contact hart@PetLvr.com.

We will display as many text links (in reason) to your own websites, and up to two logo/graphic links (125 pixel wide) that gets displayed on the left side of every page, and in the PetLvr Corner.

Once a contributor, you will have access to this blog to publish entries as you wish, or be able to email directly to this blog your content.

Please Support our Contributors

This is a small website, and each contributor is taking the time to help make this blogsite better. Please support their efforts by clicking on their Logo/Graphic banners that link to their website and browse around. Are you looking for something in particular? It's probably found in one of these sites!

Thank-You.
Take care.
HART
PetLvr.com

PetLvr.com - [The Blog]
"A Website For All Earthlings, Who Love Animals"
http://PetLvr.blogspot.com



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Friday, July 01, 2005

 

PetLvr.com wishes everybody a Happy Holiday!

If you are celebrating the festivities with your pet, here is a good article to read and to consider:



..... Fear of fireworks and other loud noises is not uncommon in pets. In the animal world, fear is a normal response to a threatening situation or aversive stimulus and is designed to protect the animal from harm. A phobia is a persistent excessive and irrational fear response. Fears and phobias can develop at any age and in any breed.

PetPlace.com - Fear of Fireworks

Click on the above link for the rest of this article ...

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~``

To my fellow PETLVRs ...

July 1, 2005
HAPPY CANADA DAY !!!!!!!!!!!!!


July 4, 2005
HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY !!!!!!!!!!!!!


HART
PetLvr.com



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Please Note: That was NOT the last post in [The Blog] ...
Please review the ARCHIVE Section at the top on the left side.

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